Skip to content

Heroes Are Heroes Again

June 17, 2010

It’s the Heroic Age, and to celebrate the brand new day, all of the marginalized, title-displaced characters of the Marvel Universe get their own anthology miniseries.  Okay, so not all of the characters are like that, but most of them are.  In Age of Heroes #1, we get for stories.  The first is about current mayor of New York City, J. Jonah Jameson, reacting to the return of the Avengers.  He still doesn’t like costumes, and he wants to use his political position to prove to people how dangerous they are and to give the U.S. back to real people.  However, he sees footage of the Avengers rescuing people in Mississippi from a tidal wave caused by the fall of Asgard.  And he sees how people react to it, how popular the Avengers are, and he changes his mind, deciding to make his upcoming speech about the good that the Avengers have done.  Because as the title of this story shows, Jameson has his thumb on the pulse of his city.  Even if he does want to keep all his old drafts decrying the Avengers… just in case.  Then, in a Dr. Voodoo story, he tries to go on a date with someone he works at a clinic with, likely a character from his short-lived ongoing series recently.  Unfortunately, a mystic menace draws him away, and his date begins to get pissed.  Then, some evil imp tries to steal some cake in the restaurant, and his girlfriend has had enough.  However, he grabs a flower the imp was wearing and gives it to her as a present.  That wins her over pretty quickly.  Then, we get a short Captain Britain and MI: 13 story.  Steve Rogers honors the team and the United Kingdom for being the first to defeat the Skrulls back in Secret Invasion, and he invites Black Knight to rejoin the team and Captain Britain to join.  Pete Wisdom isn’t too keen on the idea, but his teammates convince him to let Britain help every so often.  Then, in a quick Spider-Man story to finish things of, Spider-Man fights the Griffin (oops, continuity error with Heroic Age: Prince of Power), and people yell at him for generally being a menace, even though he’s trying to help.

Well, although none of these stories were terribly deep (not that they were supposed to be), they were very fun.  Kurt Busiek’s story with J.J.J and the Avengers was the best of all four.  Naturally, someone like Busiek would have a great grasp on one of the oldest characters in Marvel.  The whole thing just hit all the beats, and he had down Jameson’s voice perfectly.  Plus, Marko Djurdjevic’s pencils were just gorgeous.  I mean, truly gorgeous.  The Dr. Voodoo story was enjoyable.  I’m not exactly a fan of the character (not a detractor either, though I wish Dr. Strange were still Sorcerer Supreme), but this story was entertaining enough.  Chris Samnee’s pencils were decent, though he’s obviously one of those artists who excels most at drawing the non-human.  Yet even still, that one panel when Voodoo’s girlfriend is right up in his face was pretty funny.  The Captain Britain and MI: 13 story is nice, since that book was so critically acclaimed and so dead before its time.  I’ll be happy to see the team popping up every now and then in comic books, and I certainly wouldn’t mind Captain Britain being an Avenger, even if only part-time.  It’s not like he doesn’t deserve it more than basically any other British superhero.  Great to see Paul Cornell and Leonard Kirk back with these characters, even if only for two pages.  As for the Spider-Man one…  My goodness, we still have to resort to the tried plot device of “everyone still thinks that Spider-Man’s a menace?”  I won’t complain about the way Spider-man is treated in his own books any more than I already have, but that combined with the continuity error doesn’t win me over.  But hey, this was still a fun anthology miniseries, at least.  Happy to see Busiek back doing Marvel work too.

Plot: 8.3      Art: 8.0      Dialogue: 8.7      Overall: 8.2

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: